Freesia

Fall in love with the fragrance of freesia

The freesia has sparkling colours and leaves a subtle hint of perfume around the home. The vintage, retro fragrance evokes memories of springs and summers past. More recently, this flower has made a spectacular comeback, and is now very popular in bouquets.

freesia - funnyhowflowersdothat.co.uk

Colours and shapes

The freesia’s tuber forms small offshoots under the soil called beads. These beads grow up into stems and produce a comb of flowers that lends extra style to any home. They will even carry on growing merrily in the vase. The flower comes in white, yellow, orange, red, blue, pink and purple varieties, but can also be bicoloured or multicoloured. Many varieties have a beautiful sweet scent which makes your home even more attractive.  

Symbolism

The freesia stands for unconditional love. Traditionally, a married couple will exchange white freesias on their seventh anniversary as a symbol of their pure, genuine love. The beautiful fragrance of the comb of flowers lends an extra dimension to the gift of a bunch of freesias: it symbolises innocence.

Origin

The freesia is native to South Africa, where it was first named "Cape lily-of-the-valley".  In 1830, the flower was given the name of Freesia by the South African botanist Ecklon, who named it after his friend, the German Dr F. Freese.