Unveiling the floral and plant style trends of 2018

The emerging interior floral and plant trends set to dominate 2018

All the earth-shattering, controversial and uplifting real-world events we witnessed in 2017 have radically shaped the emerging interior floral and plant trends set to dominate 2018.

We’ve been working with international trend watcher Aafje Nijman to develop three key trends perfect for refreshing your home in the big interior trends predicted for 2018. The Flower Laboratory brought these trends to life at a recent London showcase, and floral designer Joan Stam demonstrated how to incorporate complex, colourful and impactful combinations of flowers and plants designed to shake up your mood and mindset for the year ahead.

Re-Assemble

Re-Assemble is a trend that layers contrasting shapes, textures and tones in a collage. Trends expert Aafje explains, “As societal norms and expectations have been thrown into disarray after the twists and turns of 2017, this year sees complex combinations that challenge our ideals even further. The latest fashion and interior design trends are demonstrating much more varied materials, patterns and shapes.”

Stack contradictory elements for a 3D scene or be flexible in the items you select with elongated stems and angular vases. It is all about being playful and experimenting with unusual elements to create unusual visuals. Floral design Joan adds, “Shape-wise, it’s important to use flowers that look as if they were manually put together, so think of gloriosa, nerine, or parrot tulips as inspiration for this. Try to also use extremes in shape as well – for example having tall flowers on one side, complemented with hanging materials on the other to make the look more striking.”

Unveiling the floral and plant style trends of 2018 funnyhowflowersdothat.co.uk

To incorporate the re-assemble trend into your home, stretch your imagination with recycled artificial materials alongside natural paper and cardboard for a nonchalant feel. Create a patchwork of bright, pastels alongside faded neutral tones and discombobulating patterns all together.

Re-Assemble power players:

Romance 3.0

“Perpetuated by the dominance of social media and a re-affirming circle of like-minded followers, we are living in our own luxury bubbles in 2018. Every passion, perspective and ideal is amplified and all-powerful,” explains trends expert Aafje. This self-indulgent state is trickling into our home too.

Decadence, rich materials and an abundance of sumptuous plants and flowers is the sure fire way to make your room look powerful and dramatic.

Floral designer Joan suggests, “You need to make eye-catching, extravagant and voluminous style choices. The colour palette for this trend is rich with deep purples intense teal and warm burgundy.” With furnishings to compliment the trend, think velvet material, marble, soft leather and copper tones to add impact. With a sprinkling of plush textures and stand-out florals, you’ll exude the Romance 3.0 aroma in no time.

Romance 3.0 power players:

Punk-Rebooted

“With the shift of power last year leaving people feeling oppressed, rebellion is brimming!” claims trends watcher Aafje. Punk-Rebooted exemplifies that rebellious streak, bringing a raw and rugged edge into our homes.

Design becomes a symbol of protest, pairing rough structures with stark colour contrast to achieve a striking visual. The placement of vivid flowers and jagged plants is so essential to transforming and enlivening your space.

Floral designer Joan explains that “to get the unpolished, industrial look use statement flowers such as Zantedeschia Cantorand and deep green plants that demand attention. Think about keep negative space to give these distinctive pieces a chance to shine.” Break conventions with lots of black, harsh red in scratched or scorched planters.

Punk-Rebooted power players:

To find out more about The Flower Laboratory, click here.

Which must-try floral and plant trends will you be incorporating into your own home in 2018? Let us know by tagging us on InstagramFacebook or Twitter.